And Finally, We’re All In

On March 2nd all three of our kids were baptized and chrismated in to the Orthodox Church.  After a journey of a few years, we have all arrived at the Church, and we are very thankful to be here.  The journey of the convert is not an easy one, but it is rewarding at the end.  Now that this journey is over, a whole new one begins.  Now we must continually convert our hearts, taking up our cross, and following our Lord and Savior in His death and life.  I look forward to seeing my entire family grow in Christ-likeness as we pursue the spiritual life together!

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And Finally, We’re All In

Odds and Ends

orthodox cathedral
orthodox cathedral (Photo credit: slideshow bob)

I wanted to make some notes here before they escaped me.  This is all minor stuff, but perhaps note worthy.

1) I was recently in another discussion with a different Protestant professor of patristics.  When asked about Protestant distinctives and his thoughts on Orthodoxy he made a curious defense of Sola Scriptura (I won’t bother to post it here) and then pointed me at Karl Barth’s discussion of the Reformed view of Scripture in chapter two of The Theology of the Reformed Confessions (http://books.google.com/books?id=KGup6Xl_lzAC&lpg=PP1&dq=barth%20reformed%20theology&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false), which thankfully I could read entirely online thanks to the preview shown on Google Books.  I’ve considered doing some “conversation” with Barth on his views, but why bother.  I didn’t find them particularly enlightening or convincing, but I can check it off my list.  Yes, I’ve read Barth’s discussion on the topic.  Moving on.

2)  I recently read another book on the issue of the primacy of the Pope, and how Orthodox and Roman Catholic might reconnect.  I thought the book was very good, and unlike my previous recommendation in this area you don’t have to read with a large grain of salt.  The book is called You Are Peter (http://www.amazon.com/You-Are-Peter-Orthodox-Reflection/dp/1565481895/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1341188415&sr=1-1&keywords=you+are+peter).  I still haven’t read Orthodoxy and the Roman Papacy: Ut Unum Sint and the Prospects of East-West Unity (http://www.amazon.com/Orthodoxy-Roman-Papacy-Prospects-East-West/dp/0268026076/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1341188445&sr=1-2&keywords=ut+unum+sint) due to the cost and other interests, but I’m sure it’s got good things to say to the subject of reunification.

3) My wife and I have been meeting with our parish priest to discuss any remaining issues we have prior to Chrismation.  We still haven’t made any commitments of scheduled anything, but this is one of the last steps.

Odds and Ends

Conversation With a Priest – 5/17/2012

[To understand what this blog is, read this first.]

Corinth Cathedral - Apostolic Succession of bi...
Corinth Cathedral – Apostolic Succession of bishops (Photo credit: © Giorgio)

I recently sat down with my parish priest for another in a long series of discussions, which I’ve recently begun to record.  I wish I had been recording them all along, but better late than never.  We discussed the recent emailing I did with a protestant professor, and the issues of iconography and apostolic succession (among other things).

Listen Now to Conversation – 5/17/2012

Listen Now to Conversation – 5/17/2012

Conversation With a Priest – 5/17/2012

Understanding development of the papacy

Deutsch: Emblem des Pontifikats English: emble...

[To understand what this blog is, read this first.]

It seems that this is papacy week for me.  After the last post I made about a book I had read on the development of the papacy I came across a document called The Role of the Bishop of Rome in the Communion of the Church in the First Millennium issued by the Joint Coordinating Committee for the Theological Dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church.  I think the content of that document reflects the Orthodox view of the papacy very well, and while long, is much shorter than a book, so enjoy.

Understanding development of the papacy

Origins of the Papacy

[To understand what this blog is, read this first.]

A picture of Pope Pius XII made after his elec...
A picture of Pope Pius XII made after his election to the papacy in 1939. It was composed by a French nun, who donated it to the Pontiff. He upon looking at it, decided “this is not me” and gave to Madre Pascalina Lehnert, who gave to the copyholder. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This doesn’t have anything to do with current research I’m doing or a letter I’m writing, but it just came to mind so I thought I’d mention it before it escaped my tiny attention span.  When doing research on the papacy I ran across this old book, now out of copyright, and read it.  Even though the author does have a bit of an axe to grind as an ex-Catholic priest (he became Orthodox), he was an extremely informed man it appears and I found it very informative and thorough on the subject of the development of the papacy.  Don’t discount old books.  Just because a book wasn’t written in the last ten years doesn’t mean it’s out of date or irrelevant.  There’s a LOT in this book to consider.

Thanks to Google you can also get it in ebook form, which is super handy.  You can get the ebook by clicking the button on the top left that says Read Ebook.

The Papacy: Its Historic Origin and Primitive Relations with the Eastern Churches by Abbe Guettee, D.D.

Origins of the Papacy